NSC expo
Subscribe or Register
View Cart  

Earn recertification points from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals by taking a quiz about this issue.

What's Your Opinion?

Has an employer ever asked you to do something that violated your code of ethics as a safety professional?

Take the poll and add your comment.

Vote   Results

Get the news that's
important to you.

Sign up for Safety+Health’s free monthly newsletters on:

  • Construction
  • Health Care Workers
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining, Oil and Gas
  • Office Safety Tips
  • Transportation
  • Worker Health and Wellness
  • Subscribe today

    Diet drinks may harm older women’s health: study

    April 2, 2014

    Tags
    • / Print
    • Reprints
    • Text Size:
      A A

    Iowa City, IA – Drinking two or more diet beverages a day may increase older women’s risk of having a heart attack, suggests a new study from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

    The study involved 59,614 postmenopausal women who had completed a questionnaire about their diet drink habits during a three-month period. A follow-up more than eight years later revealed that women who consumed two or more drinks a day were 30 percent more likely to have a cardiovascular event and 50 percent more likely to die from a related condition, according to a press release.

    Heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure and other heart events occurred in 8.5 percent of women who had two or more drinks a day, compared with 7.2 percent of women who had zero to three drinks a week.

    High consumption of diet beverages was more likely among women who were young; smoked; and had diabetes, hypertension and a high body mass index, researchers found. They noted that although the study does not prove cause-and-effect, the link remained after they adjusted for demographic characteristics and individual risk factors.