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One-third of workers say their employer favors productivity over safety, NSC survey shows

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Photo: Grzegorz Oleksa/iStock/Thinkstock

Itasca, IL – One-third of employees believe their employer prioritizes productivity over safety, according to the results of a recent survey from the National Safety Council.

NSC collected feedback from 2,000 workers across the country as part of the survey, which was released in conjunction with National Safety Month.

The feeling was highest among construction workers: 60 percent of those surveyed said safety was a lower priority than getting the job done, followed by 52 percent of workers in the forestry, fishing and hunting industry.

Other findings from the survey:

  • 62 percent of construction workers, as well as workers in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, said management does only the minimum required by law to protect workers.
  • 61 percent of employees in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting said workers resist working safely.
  • 49 percent of temporary and contract workers, and 41 percent of workers in health care, reported being afraid to report safety issues.

On a positive note, 70 percent of employees reported that safety training is a component of their job orientation and said their workplace promotes employee health and well-being.

“Every employee deserves a safe workplace,” NSC President and CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman said in a press release. “While some of our findings were encouraging, others were a stark reminder of how far we still have to go to ensure safety is every employer’s highest priority.”

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