Safety Tips Driving safety

Understand new driving technologies

National Safety Month Week 4

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Photo: Jennifer Yario

You might not realize it, but driving to and from work may be one of the most dangerous things you do every day. According to the 2017 edition of Injury Facts, more than 40,000 people were killed in transportation-related incidents in 2016. Fortunately, modern cars come with a number of safety features designed to protect drivers and pedestrians. You just have to know how to use them.

Advanced Driver Assistance Systems – such as automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and backup cameras – have the “potential to prevent many crashes and reduce injuries, as 94 percent of motor vehicle crashes involve driver error,” according to NSC. However, you are still your vehicle’s best safety feature. If you’re behind the wheel, you need to pay attention and stay alert for hazards.

Rental car safety

Do you ever have to rent a car? If so, you need to understand the vehicle’s safety features. Read the safety manual of the rental car, and ask rental car staff questions before you leave the lot. Sit in the car, start the engine and try out the features. Don’t assume that features in the rental car will work the same way as those in your personal vehicle.

Safe driving behaviors

Everyone can and should practice safe driving. Even if your car has all of the latest safety features, you still need to follow these basic safe driving behaviors:

  • Don’t drive impaired.
  • Don’t use your cellphone – hands-free or handheld – behind the wheel.
  • Make sure everyone is buckled up.
  • Pay attention to vehicle alerts and warnings.

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