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Work stress puts women at risk for heart disease: study

November 18, 2010

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Women with demanding jobs but little control over their daily work have an 88 percent higher risk of heart attack than women with low job strain, indicates new research from Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Researchers analyzed job strain among 17,415 middle-aged health professionals enrolled in a long-running study of women's health. Women in stressful jobs had a 40 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, stroke, coronary artery bypass surgery and death, according to a press release from the Dallas-based American Heart Association.

In addition, fear of losing one's job was associated with increased blood pressure, cholesterol and body weight -- risk factors for heart disease.

The research was presented Nov. 15 at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2010.



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