NSC expo
Subscribe or Register
View Cart  

Earn recertification points from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals by taking a quiz about this issue.

What's Your Opinion?

Do you believe most underrecording of injuries is unintentional or deliberate?

Take the poll and add your comment.

Vote Results

Injury and illness costs up since 1992: study

January 18, 2012

Tags
  • / Print
  • Reprints
  • Text Size:
    A A

Sacramento, CA – Occupational injuries and illnesses cost the country $250 billion in 2007, according to new research from the University of California, Davis. This represents a $33 billion increase (adjusted for inflation) since the last similar analysis in 1992.

Based on more than 40 data sets, the study estimated that 8,564,600 fatal and nonfatal work-related injuries occurred in 2007, which cost $192 billion; along with 516,100 fatal and nonfatal work-related illnesses totaling $58 billion.

In addition, approximately 59,102 combined deaths were caused by occupational injuries and diseases – more than motor vehicle crashes or breast cancer.

The high figures are not accounted for in workers’ compensation premiums, study author J. Paul Leigh said in a press release from NIOSH, which funded the study. Leigh recommended using injury and illness costs per business instead of industry-wide costs to determine workers’ comp premiums.

The study appeared in the December issue of the Milbank Quarterly.

Post a comment to this article

Safety+Health welcomes comments that promote respectful dialogue. Please stay on topic. Comments that contain personal attacks, profanity or abusive language – or those aggressively promoting products or services – will be removed. We reserve the right to determine which comments violate our comment policy.