NSC expo
Subscribe or Register
View Cart  

Earn recertification points from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals by taking a quiz about this issue.

What's Your Opinion?

Are you concerned about how new laws regarding medical and recreational marijuana will affect workplace safety?

Take the poll and add your comment.

Vote Results

Most buildings contain asthma-linked substances: study

September 5, 2012

Tags
  • / Print
  • Reprints
  • Text Size:
    A A

New York – Many parts of indoor environments, such as structural materials and filtration systems, may contain substances linked to asthma, according to a study (.pdf file) from global interdisciplinary design firm Perkins+Will.

Researchers compared 374 known asthmagens – substances that elicit an asthma respiratory response – against lists of commonly used substances in building designs. They concluded 75 asthmagens were found in most buildings, contained in the following:

  • Building materials and furnishings
  • Central heating and cooling systems
  • Humidification devices
  • Household cleaning, personal care and hobby products

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that indoor environments (where Americans spend most of their time) contain pollutant levels 2-3 times higher, and sometimes 100 times higher, than outdoor environments, a Perkins+Will press release stated. The firm called on the building industry to improve indoor conditions.

The study was conducted for the National Institutes of Health. It was published Aug. 8 as part of the Perkins+Will Transparency Initiative.

Post a comment to this article

Safety+Health welcomes comments that promote respectful dialogue. Please stay on topic. Comments that contain personal attacks, profanity or abusive language – or those aggressively promoting products or services – will be removed. We reserve the right to determine which comments violate our comment policy.