NSC expo
Subscribe or Register
View Cart  

Earn recertification points from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals by taking a quiz about this issue.

On Safety

Kyle Morrison's blog

A blog by Safety+Health Senior Associate Editor Kyle W. Morrison


kyle.morrison@nsc.org


Sign up to be notified by email about new posts on this blog.


Subscribe to the RSS feed


Silica hearings offer unique opportunity

March 13, 2014

  • / Print
  • Reprints
  • Text Size:
    A A

The next three weeks are shaping up to be interesting for OSHA, as far as its proposed rule on crystalline silica is concerned.

Beginning March 18 and running through April 4, OSHA will host a series of informal public meetings on the proposed rule. An administrative law judge will preside over the hearings, and stakeholders from union groups, industry representatives, associations, scientists, medical professionals and more are scheduled to make presentations.

But it won’t simply be a rehash of comments already submitted. According to the hearing procedures, participants will be able to question others on their presentations. The question time is limited to the scope of the presentation, and can’t be used as a forum to present testimony or views.

This is a large amount of time to spend on a single proposed rule – I can’t recall OSHA previously spending 14 days straight on another proposal. The atmosphere should provide a lot of information and clarification on the rule, and highlight some flaws that could lead to a better final rule down the line.

For those who aren’t able to attend, a transcript of the meetings will be available later on the public docket.

The opinions expressed in "On Safety" do not necessarily reflect those of the National Safety Council or affiliated local Chapters.

Post a comment to this article

Safety+Health welcomes comments that promote respectful dialogue. Please stay on topic. Comments that contain personal attacks, profanity or abusive language – or those aggressively promoting products or services – will be removed. We reserve the right to determine which comments violate our comment policy.