Workplace exposure

ARTICLES

Don’t be overcome by carbon monoxide

Workers who operate equipment such as cutting saws, pumps and generators in buildings or semi-enclosed spaces are at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning – even in areas that appear well-ventilated.
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Limiting exposure to hazardous noise

Every year, roughly 30 million people in the Unites States are exposed to hazardous noise at work, according to OSHA. High levels of noise can result in permanent hearing loss for workers.
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Wood dust exposure

Using machines to cut, smooth or shape wood materials can expose workers to wood dust. According to Oregon OSHA, wood dust is classified as a hazardous chemical because wood can contain chemical contaminants such as herbicides and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring molds and fungi.
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Mercury spills

Mercury can be found in a variety of products, including barometers, blood pressure measurers, batteries and some types of lightbulbs. The Illinois Department of Public Health states that workers can be exposed to mercury through breathing vapors, direct skin contact, or by eating food or drinking water contaminated with mercury.
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Avoid lead exposure

According to NIOSH, workers can be exposed to lead through fumes (produced when metal is being heated or soldered) or dust (produced when metal is being cut or when lead paint is sanded or removed with a heat gun).
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