Workplace exposure

ARTICLES

Avoid lead exposure

According to NIOSH, workers can be exposed to lead through fumes (produced when metal is being heated or soldered) or dust (produced when metal is being cut or when lead paint is sanded or removed with a heat gun).
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Cadmium exposure safety and training

Cadmium is a soft, malleable metal that, according to OSHA, can cause serious health problems for workers exposed to it. When using this metal, proper personal protective equipment must be worn because cadmium is highly toxic.
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Bloodborne pathogen exposure

First responders are at risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens such as hepatitis B and C and HIV, NIOSH warns. Exposure can occur by way of needlesticks; contact with contaminated sharp objects; or eye, mouth, nose or broken skin contact with blood or other potentially infectious bodily fluids.
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Work safely with tungsten carbide

Tungsten carbide is a metal alloy commonly used in manufacturing because of its hardness and resistance to wear and high temperatures. According to the New Jersey Department of Health’s Division of Epidemiology, Environmental and Occupational Health, exposure to tungsten carbide may result in lung issues, as it often contains nickel and chromium, which can trigger asthma.
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Avoid exposure to dry-cutting dust

When workers cut or grind concrete, brick or stone, the resulting dust may contain crystalline silica. According to the New Jersey Department of Health Division of Epidemiology, Environmental and Occupational Health, when workers inhale crystalline silica dust, silica particles can scar the lungs and cause a disabling and incurable lung disease called silicosis.
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