Leadership

Highlights from the 2014 NSC Congress & Expo

Reprints
congress-wrapup-for-slider1.jpg

NSC honors six with Distinguished Service to Safety Award

The National Safety Council honored six individuals with its highest award for safety professionals during the Opening Session of the 2014 NSC Congress & Expo on Sept. 15.

The Distinguished Service to Safety Award is presented annually to those who have devoted their careers to improving safety and health at work, on the roads, and in homes and communities. The award was first presented in 1942 to recognize individuals and companies that strived to reduce occupational injuries during World War II.

“These 2014 award recipients are living examples of the Journey to Safety Excellence – continually working to improve safety within their respective industries,” Deborah A.P. Hersman, NSC president and CEO, said during the session. “Their career achievements have resulted in lives saved and injuries prevented, and their passion for safety has inspired the next generation of safety leaders.”

NSC Divisions each nominate someone for the award. This year’s recipients are:

Business and Industry Division
Gary D. Kopps
Associate Director, Global Work and Life Safety
John Deere & Co.

Construction Division
David P. Kliwinski
HSE Director
Jacobs Engineering Group

Labor Division
Ronald E. Kline
Safety Representative, United Auto Workers, Local 171
Mack Truck Corp./Volvo Group

NSC Board of Directors
James A. Solomon
Director, Defensive Driving Courses Program Development and Training
National Safety Council

Transportation Division
Thomas C. DiSalvi
Vice President of Safety and Loss Prevention
Schneider National Inc.

Utilities Division
Jody Rood
President
American ERT

Post a comment to this article

Safety+Health welcomes comments that promote respectful dialogue. Please stay on topic. Comments that contain personal attacks, profanity or abusive language – or those aggressively promoting products or services – will be removed. We reserve the right to determine which comments violate our comment policy. (Anonymous comments are welcome; merely skip the “name” field in the comment box. An email address is required but will not be included with your comment.)