Personal protective equipment

ARTICLES

Stay cautious when working with mercury

Metallic mercury is a liquid at room temperature and can readily evaporate into the air. It’s also a potent neurotoxin that, in small amounts, can cause serious health problems, according to the California Department of Public Health.
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Understanding latex allergies

The Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety describes latex as a milky sap produced by certain plants, shrubs and trees, including the commercial rubber tree Havea braziliensis. This protein substance has been identified by researchers as a major source of latex allergies.
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Protect workers’ hearing

Is the noise at your workplace harming your hearing? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 22 million workers are exposed to hazardous noise on the job every year.
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Toluene safety

Toluene is a clear and colorless liquid that turns to vapor when exposed to air at room temperature. According to OSHA, it’s often used in a mixture with other solvents and chemicals, such as paint pigments, so employees who work with paint, metal cleaners and adhesives may be at risk for exposure.
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The basics of high-visibility safety apparel

Workers in a wide variety of jobs and industries wear high-visibility safety apparel to alert others of their presence, particularly in dark or dim places. Users include utility linemen, construction workers, police officers and school bus drivers, to name a few.
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Caring for respirators

Making sure respirators are in proper working order is critical to ensuring they perform as intended. The Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety recommends following a number of steps when caring for your respirator.
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Hazard alert: Scaffolding

Building scaffolding for work projects can present numerous serious hazards to employees. According to OSHA, injuries related to scaffolds include falls, tip-overs, being struck by falling equipment, and coming into contact with energized power lines.
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Hard hats: Know the facts

A construction worker removes his hard hat because he is too warm. An engineer refuses to wear head protection, as she has “never been hurt before.” A utility worker thinks hard hats make him look silly and removes his every chance he gets.
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