Federal agencies Recordkeeping

No change to number of on-the-job injuries and illnesses in private sector, BLS says

Reprints

Washington — The number of nonfatal work-related injuries and illnesses in the U.S. private sector remained unchanged in 2019, as did the incidence rate of total recordable cases, according to annual data released Nov. 4 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Workers in private industry experienced an estimated 2.8 million nonfatal injuries and illnesses last year – the same as over the past three years. The total recordable rate – also unchanged for the third consecutive year – was 2.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers. Estimated nonfatal injuries and illnesses that resulted in at least one day of lost work totaled 888,220 – “essentially unchanged from 2018” as well.

Other findings:

  • The manufacturing sector accounted for 15% of the estimated 2.8 million injuries and illnesses, but its total recordable rate decreased to 3.3 per 100 FTE workers from 3.4 in 2018.
  • The median number of days away from work was eight, the same as in 2018.
  • Injured employees age 65 or older had a median DAFW of 16.
  • The DAFW incident rate for men decreased to 91.7 per 10,000 FTE workers from 94.3. For women, that rate decreased to 80.4 from 83.4.
 

Additionally, private-industry workers with sprains, strains or tears that resulted in DAFW visited medical treatment facilities at a rate of 6.5 cases per 10,000 FTE workers – down from 7.3 cases in 2018. BLS noted that medical treatment facilities include emergency rooms and/or inpatient hospitalizations.

BLS obtains its estimates from the agency’s Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

Post a comment to this article

Safety+Health welcomes comments that promote respectful dialogue. Please stay on topic. Comments that contain personal attacks, profanity or abusive language – or those aggressively promoting products or services – will be removed. We reserve the right to determine which comments violate our comment policy. (Anonymous comments are welcome; merely skip the “name” field in the comment box. An email address is required but will not be included with your comment.)