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Fatigue, drinking among driver behaviors that contribute to ‘perennial crisis’: report

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Austin, TX — More than 7 out of 10 people admit to driving drowsy, and nearly 1 in 4 say they’ve driven drunk, according to a recent report from online driving school DriversEd.com.

Researchers conducted an online survey of 957 licensed drivers. Results, published in the 2019 Behind-the-Wheel Confessions Report, show that 71% of the respondents reported they’ve driven while feeling drowsy, 24% admitted to driving drunk and 40% said they’ve experienced road rage.

“When it comes to driving safety, the country and its roadways are in a state of perennial crisis – and the situation is getting worse, largely thanks to phones, texting and social media,” Laura Adams, safety and education analyst for DriversEd.com, said in a May 31 press release.

Other findings:

  • 89% of the respondents said they’ve exceeded the speed limit.
  • 58% said they’ve rolled past a stop sign without making a complete stop.
  • 47% said they’ve run a red light.
  • 31% said they check their cellphone more often than they should.

“For each and every one of these hazardous behind-the-wheel behaviors, there are solutions – from checking your eyesight and hearing to assigning a designated driver to setting calendar reminders to inspect your tires to meditating before driving to simply exercising self-discipline,” Adams said.

Drivers operating on four to five hours of sleep are four times more likely to be involved in a traffic incident, according to the National Safety Council, which recommends getting at least seven hours of sleep before driving, and stopping to rest every two hours during long commutes.

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