Safety Tips Injury prevention Off the job

Stay alert for dangers

National Safety Month Tip: Week 3

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Photo: Christopher Futcher

It’s important to be on the lookout for hazards throughout the day. Whether you’re walking to work, taking care of an elderly relative or watching your children, the National Safety Council offers a variety of tips to help stay safe all the time:

  • Avoid distracted walking. Stop walking and move to the side when reading emails or texts. Never cross a street while using an electronic device.
  • Falls are the leading cause of death for older adults. Install anti-slip mats and grab bars in the bath or shower, and handrails on stairs. In addition, ensure every room and stairway has adequate lighting, which may include nightlights.
  • More than one-third of injuries and deaths among children occur at home. Stay vigilant for sources of potential injury, including pools, bathtubs, fireplaces, grills, and chemicals stored under the sink or in your garage.

Wherever you are, consider the hazards unique to the location. A fun outing could turn stressful quickly if you’re injured.

  • Going to a ballgame? Watch for foul balls.
  • Heading to a concert? Consider earplugs to help protect your hearing. Check for cables that may run along floors.
  • Visiting someplace new? Designate a meeting place in case you get separated.

Whether you’re in your home or visiting others, be aware that seemingly harmless electronic devices (remote controls, keyless-entry devices, toys, watches and more) may contain coin lithium batteries (also called “button batteries”) that can cause serious injury or death if swallowed.

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