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    Research/studies | Worker health and wellness

    Long hours, job demands linked to depression: study

    September 4, 2013

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    Kyoto, Japan – Working long hours in a high-demand job increases the risk of developing depression, a new study from the Kyoto University School of Public Health concludes.

    Researchers analyzed four surveys of more than 200 clerical workers – conducted in the late 1990s and early 2000s – who were asked how many hours they worked per week, how demanding their job was, and about their well-being. Employees who worked at least 60 hours a week and reported “usually” having too much work to do were at a higher risk of depression, according to the study. This risk increased over time.

    The risk of a major depressive disorder could be reduced through targeted mental health measures, including a change in a worker’s hours or job demands, the study authors suggested.

    The study was published in the August issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.