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kyle.morrison@nsc.org


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OSHA Top 10 updated

December 4, 2013

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Because of the federal government shutdown, Safety+Health’s annual article on the top 10 for fiscal year 2013 had to use preliminary data.

I’ve since been in touch with OSHA officials, and this week I will be unveiling updated top 10 figures and additional details.

To kick things off, here is the updated top 10 list and violations total:

Ranking – Standard – Number of violations

1. – Fall Protection – General Requirements (1926.501) – 8,739
Top five sections cited:
Residential construction (b)(13) – 4,733
Unprotected sides and edges (b)(1) – 1,696
Roofing work on low-slope roofs (b)(10) – 912
Steep roofs (b)(11) – 656
Holes (b)(4) – 328

2. – Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 6,556
Top five sections cited:
Maintaining a written hazard communication program (e)(1) – 2,469
Providing employees with information and training (h)(1) – 1,561
Chemical container labeling (f)(5) – 701
Maintaining Safety Data Sheets (g)(8) – 611
Obtaining or developing safety data sheets (g)(1) – 496

3. – Scaffolding (1926.451) – 5,724
Top five sections cited:
Protection from falls to a lower level (g)(1) – 1,589
Planking or decking requirements (b)(1) – 788
Point of access for scaffold platforms (e)(1) – 781
Foundation requirements (c)(2) – 632
Guardrail requirements (g)(4) – 376

4. – Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 4,153
Top five sections cited:
Medical evaluation general requirements (e)(1) – 705
Establishing and implementing written respirator protection program (c)(1) – 650
Covering situations when respirator use is not required (c)(2) – 510
Respirator selection general requirements (d)(1) – 342
Ensuring employer used respirators are fit tested (f)(2) – 332

5. – Electrical – Wiring methods (1910.305) – 3,709
Top five sections cited:
Use of flexible cords and cables (g)(1) – 1,004
Conductors entering boxes, cabinets or fittings (b)(1) – 821
Identification, splices and terminations (g)(2) – 703
Covers and canopies (b)(2) – 577
Temporary wiring (a)(2) – 194

6. – Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 3,544
Top five sections cited:
Safe operation (l)(1) – 905
Refresher training and evaluation (l)(4) – 575
Certification of trained and evaluated operators (l)(6) – 377
Taking truck out of service when repairs are necessary (p)(1) – 336
Maintenance of industrial trucks (q)(7) – 304

7. – Ladders (1926.1053) – 3,524
Requirements for portable ladders used for accessing upper landing surfaces (b)(1) – 1,866
Ladder use only for its design purpose (b)(4) – 482
Not using the top or top step of stepladder as a step (b)(13) – 268
Marking portable ladders with structural defects with tags noting them as defective (b)(16) – 215
Employees shall not carry objects or loads that could cause them to lose balance and fall (b)(22) – 107

8. – Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 3,505
Top five sections cited:
Energy control procedure (c)(4) – 996
Periodic inspection (c)(6) – 653
Energy control program (c)(1) – 651
Training and communication (c)(7) – 580
Lockout or tagout device application (d)(4) – 169

9. – Electrical – General Requirements (1910.303) – 2,932
Top five sections cited:
Installation and use of equipment (b)(2) – 814
Space around electric equipment (g)(1) – 670
Guarding of live parts (g)(2) – 347
Services, feeders and branch circuits (f)(2) – 327
Examination of equipment (b)(1) – 280

10. – Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 2,852
Top five sections cited:
Types of guarding (a)(1) – 1,815
Point of operation guarding (a)(3) – 662
Anchoring fixed machinery (b) – 214
Exposure of blades (a)(5) – 79
General requirements (a)(2) – 73

Source: OSHA

Check back later this week for more details on the top 10.

The opinions expressed in "Washington Wire" do not necessarily reflect those of the National Safety Council or affiliated local Chapters.

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