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COVID-19 pandemic: Michigan OSHA launches emphasis programs for construction, manufacturing

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Lansing, MI — Michigan OSHA is increasing its presence on construction sites and in manufacturing facilities as part of two state emphasis programs launched Nov. 16 in an effort to help ensure employers in these industries protect their workers from exposure to COVID-19.

MIOSHA states that investigations will be conducted by either an industrial hygienist or safety officer to review COVID-19-related hazards and each establishment’s preparedness and response plan. The agency also will look at compliance with its recording and reporting of occupational injuries and illnesses rules. To determine if a COVID-19 case was caused by workplace exposure, MIOSHA will interview management representatives and employees while reviewing company injury and illness records.

For manufacturing settings with offices in the facility, the MIOSHA representative performing the inspection will assess the employer’s remote work policy to determine if it was created – as required by the state’s Emergency Rules for Coronavirus 2019 – and whether it has been implemented.

Both emphasis programs are slated to remain in effect until Feb. 8. The MIOSHA Consultation Education and Training Division has published a video and a COVID-19 Workplace Requirements guidance document that are geared toward employers in the construction industry. The resources can be used to assist workplaces with guidelines and ensure compliance with the state’s emergency rules.

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