Workplace exposure

ARTICLES

Keeping workers safe from asbestos

Asbestos, a group of minerals that occur naturally as bundles of fibers, was once touted as a “miracle product” for its strength and ability to resist corrosion and fire. However, asbestos can be extremely dangerous to workers, and is now known to cause cancer in humans.
Read More

Understand the hazards of asphalt

Millions of tons of asphalt are produced and used in the paving and roofing industries every year, the Texas Department of Insurance Division of Workers’ Compensation notes, and more than 500,000 workers are exposed to fumes from asphalt.
Read More

Understanding RF radiation

For most workers, radiofrequency radiation – an invisible type of non-ionizing radiation used to transmit wireless information – isn’t something to be overly concerned about. Low levels of RF radiation aren’t considered hazardous, according to the Center for Construction Research and Training (also known as CPWR).
Read More

Prevent needlestick and sharps injuries

Needlestick and sharps injuries occur when needles or other sharp objects inadvertently puncture a person’s skin, and can happen “when people use, disassemble or dispose of needles,” according to the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety.
Read More

Toluene safety

Toluene is a clear and colorless liquid that turns to vapor when exposed to air at room temperature. According to OSHA, it’s often used in a mixture with other solvents and chemicals, such as paint pigments, so employees who work with paint, metal cleaners and adhesives may be at risk for exposure.
Read More

Stay safe around wood dust

Exposure to wood dust can cause health problems for workers. Wood has natural chemicals and may contain bacteria, molds or fungi, according to the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety.
Read More

Outdoor workers and skin cancer

The American Academy of Dermatology cautions outdoor workers to be aware of an invisible hazard: the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Exposure to these rays for hours is a major risk factor for a number of skin cancers, including melanoma – the most serious form.
Read More