Workplace exposure

ARTICLES

Stay safe around wood dust

Exposure to wood dust can cause health problems for workers. Wood has natural chemicals and may contain bacteria, molds or fungi, according to the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety.
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Outdoor workers and skin cancer

The American Academy of Dermatology cautions outdoor workers to be aware of an invisible hazard: the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Exposure to these rays for hours is a major risk factor for a number of skin cancers, including melanoma – the most serious form.
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Avoiding lead exposure at work

Lead is a toxic, naturally occurring heavy metal. Although used less often than in the past, it can be found in a variety of industries, including construction, mining and manufacturing.


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Cleaning chemicals: Know the risks

Breathing problems. Itchy skin, rashes and burns. Irritated eyes. For some workers, including maintenance workers, janitors and housekeepers, these symptoms may have a common factor: cleaning products.
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Avoid toluene exposure

Toluene – often used in paint, metal cleaners and adhesives – is a clear, colorless liquid that vaporizes when exposed to air at room temperature. According to OSHA, it also has a sharp and sweet smell, which is a sign of exposure.
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Carbon monoxide: The ‘silent killer’

You can’t smell it, taste it or see it, but it can be deadly. Carbon monoxide – sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” – prevents oxygen from going into the body and can result in death in a short period of time, the Michigan Department of Community Health states. But how does carbon monoxide form, and when are workers at risk?
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What is pneumoconiosis?

Pneumoconiosis is an encompassing term given to “any lung disease caused by dusts that are breathed in and then deposited deep in the lungs causing damage,” the American Lung Association states. Pneumoconiosis generally is considered an occupational lung disease because exposure to the dusts that can cause the condition often takes place at work.
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Working safely with cement

From homes and workplaces to sidewalks and playgrounds, cement is everywhere. According to the Portland Cement Association, cement is one of the safest building materials available – when precautions are observed.
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