Security Products and Lighting 2020

Trends in ... safety lighting/security products

See and be seen

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What’s new in the safety lighting field, and what are people concerned about? Here, Dawn Dalldorf-Jackson, director of sales for the industrial division at Eagleville, PA-based Streamlight Inc., and David C. Brands, CEO and owner of COAST Products in Portland, OR, offer their insights.

Progress

Twenty year ago, halogen lights dominated the personal and jobsite safety lighting market, Brands noted, adding that they were big, hot, expensive and breakable. “Now, LED lights can provide the same light output in a much smaller package and provide better light, require less power to run and are virtually indestructible.”

When discussing professional-grade flashlights, Dalldorf-Jackson said safety features are now more plentiful. “The newest class of work lights fit in tight places, are hands-free or hanging, can rotate on [workers] bodies to provide area lighting wherever it’s needed and also offer features like gasket-sealed lenses that are impervious to common corrosive chemicals,” she said. Regarding scene lights, the new generation is waterproof, stackable and features unbreakable steel frames, Dalldorf-Jackson said.

Areas of concern

Customers frequently struggle with storing charging equipment for lighting products, said Dalldorf-Jackson, who noted that the trend of USB rechargeable lights is eliminating the need for hanging charging stations, as well as loose cords that can be tripping hazards.

Brands said the biggest concern regarding safety lighting used to be the cost associated with alkaline batteries, or the inconvenience of rechargeable batteries. However, light systems are now available that allow workers to use alkaline or lithium rechargeable batteries interchangeably. “Now users have the convenience of alkaline batteries and the cost efficiency of a rechargeable light in the same product,” he said.

Words of wisdom

All workers should have a high-quality personal or portable light that allows them to see and be seen, Brands said. “Workers and employers really need to understand that a very inexpensive (less than $100) purchase of a really good, quality portable or wearable light can prevent serious accidents and save lives.”

Compiled with the assistance of the International Safety Equipment Association

Coming next month:

  • Hearing protection
  • Respiratory protection

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