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OSHA announces availability of Susan Harwood Training Grants

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Washington — OSHA has made available $11.7 million as part of its Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, the agency announced June 17.

The grants support training and education that help employers and workers identify and prevent workplace safety and health hazards. They’re available to non-profit organizations, “including community-based, faith-based, grassroots organizations, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor/management associations, Indian tribes, and public/state colleges and universities.”

The grants will “target disadvantaged, underserved, low-income and other hard-to-reach, at-risk workers and employers,” OSHA says in a press release.

Grants will be awarded for:

 

Targeted Topic Training: Support for educational programs that identify and prevent workplace hazards and require applicants to conduct training on OSHA-designated workplace safety and health hazards.
Training and Educational Materials Development: Supporting the development of quality classroom-ready training and educational materials that identify and prevent workplace hazards.
Capacity Building: Allowing organizations to develop a new training program to assess needs and formulate a plan for moving forward to a full-scale safety and health education program, expanding their capacity to provide occupational safety and health training, education, and related assistance to workers and employers.

 

The deadline for applications is 11:59 p.m. Eastern on Aug. 1. Those wishing to apply must register with grants.gov and the System of Award Management.

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