Driving safety

Avoid cellphone distractions while driving

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Transportation-related incidents accounted for 49,430 on-the-job injuries in 2019, according to Injury Facts, a National Safety Council statistics database. One reason for these injuries? Workers who are driving distracted. NSC says driver distractions fall into three categories: visual, manual and cognitive. One action fits into all three: Cellphone use while driving. 

Using your cellphone behind the wheel increases your risk of a crash fourfold. NSC offers tips for staying safe:

  • Turn off cellphones while driving, or put cellphones in your vehicle’s trunk to resist temptation. Another suggestion is to record a voicemail greeting that tells callers you’re driving and will return their call when you arrive at your destination. Or, consider switching your cellphone to “Do Not Disturb” mode.
  • Don’t make or answer cellphone calls, even with hands-free and voice recognition devices. If you must make an emergency call, leave the road and park in a safe area.
  • Don’t send or read text messages or emails. 
  • If you’re driving with a passenger, allow them to operate the phone. 
  • Program directions into your navigation system before you leave. Enable the audible directions feature so GPS can verbally share step-by-step directions. 

NSC recognizes April as Distracted Driving Awareness Month. Visit distracteddriving.nsc.org for more information.

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