Seasonal safety: Spring

ARTICLES

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Drive safely in the rain

Rain can reduce or impair your view of the road, the Nevada Department of Transportation points out. Combined with reduced tire traction on wet roadways, “It’s easy to see that driving in the rain needs to be treated with extra caution.”
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Avoid the sting: Working outdoors with insects

Outdoor workers are unique in that they regularly share their workspaces with wasps, bees, hornets and other stinging insects. It’s important for workers to know how to respond to and treat stings, especially because some people may be allergic.
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Water damage prevention planning

Which locations in my building are at highest risk for water leaks, and how can I prevent them?
Which locations in my building are at highest risk for water leaks, and how can I prevent them?
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Study finds golf cart-related injuries are common

Columbus, OH — Golf cart users, be “FORE!”-warned: The zippy means of transportation – no longer limited to golf courses – carries “considerable risk of injury and morbidity” to drivers and passengers of all ages, especially kids and older adults, say researchers from the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.
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Kids and hot cars

‘Not just a summertime issue’
According to the National Safety Council, in 2018, 53 children died in hot cars. Although these incidents are more common in the summer months, they’re not limited to July and August.
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Safe spring cleaning: 12 tips

Before tackling spring cleaning, you should be aware of the hazards that may await you: handling household chemicals, lifting heavy objects, navigating around clutter, walking on wet surfaces, and reaching or climbing – to name a few.
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Preventing tick bites

Ticks can carry potentially life-threatening infectious diseases. Most active during warmer months (April-September), they reside mostly in grassy, brushy or wooded areas – putting virtually all outdoor workers in the United States at risk of exposure.
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