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New OSHA video: The inspection process, procedures

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Photo: OSHA

Washington — OSHA has released a new video detailing its general inspection process and the reasons for inspections.

The five-minute video describes what occurs during each of the three phases of an OSHA inspection: opening conference, walkaround and closing conference.

Reasons for inspections include imminent danger situations, fatalities, hospitalizations, amputations or losses of an eye, worker complaints, referrals, targeted inspections aimed at certain high-hazard industries or individual workplaces, and follow-up inspections.

After an inspection, the compliance safety and health officer – or compliance officer – will share findings with the OSHA area director, who will determine whether to issue a citation. A covered establishment then has 15 days to respond to the citation. The employer’s response can include requesting an informal conference with the area director or contesting the citation.

 

The video also highlights the agency’s free On-Site Consultation Program for small and medium-sized employers and OSHA Training Institute Education Center training courses designed for workers, employers and managers.

“A safe workplace benefits everyone,” the video states. “OSHA uses both enforcement and compliance assistance to achieve this shared goal. Ensuring compliance with OSHA standards is an integral part of the agency’s mission to keep workers safe and healthy. That’s why OSHA is working to give employers the knowledge and tools they need to comply with their obligations and provide safety information to workers.”

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